Books for Progressing Readers, Fountas & Pinnell Level K,L & DRA 18 - 20

There's a lot of controversy about sharing a child's reading level. I like to think of it this way: you would never walk into an advanced tennis class before picking up a racket, right? You want to practice new skills on your skill level in a way that teaches the concepts you are working on while also challenging you to the extent that makes you feel engaged, confident and ready to try again.

Learning to read is similar. My short advice: let kids explore all books, while also reading a few books on their reading level to stretch and grow their skills. Present the leveled books as a gift and a special time together rather than a punishment. My hope is that these lists help parents provide the right books for their kids so that all kids become confident readers!

Spoon by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

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Gaston by Kelly DiPucchio

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The Dot by Peter Reynolds

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Me…Jane by Patrick McDonnell

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Cordurouy by Don Freeman

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What Do You Do WIth a Tail Like This? by Steve Jenkins & Robin Page

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Owen by Kevin Henkes

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 Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans

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The Egg is Quiet by Dianna Hutts Aston

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 Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

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Books for Progressing Readers, Fountas & Pinnell Level I, J & DRA 16 - 20

There's a lot of controversy about sharing a child's reading level. I like to think of it this way: you would never walk into an advanced tennis class before picking up a racket, right? You want to practice new skills on your skill level in a way that teaches the concepts you are working on while also challenging you to the extent that makes you feel engaged, confident and ready to try again.

Learning to read is similar. My short advice: let kids explore all books, while also reading a few books on their reading level to stretch and grow their skills. Present the leveled books as a gift and a special time together rather than a punishment. My hope is that these lists help parents provide the right books for their kids so that all kids become confident readers!

I Want My Hate Back by Jon Klassen

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Hush! A Thai Lullabye by Minfong Ho

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Blackout by John Rocco

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We're Going On A Bear Hunt by Helen Oxenbury

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Noisy, Nora by Rosemary Wells

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Leo The Late Bloomer by Robert Kraus

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A Very Busy Spider by Eric Carle

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Henry and Mudge by Cynthia Rylant

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Engaging Books for Beginning and Progressing Readers: Fountas & Pinnell Level G, H & DRA Level 12 - 14

There's a lot of controversy about sharing a child's reading level. I like to think of it this way: you would never walk into an advanced tennis class before picking up a racket, right? You want to practice new skills on your skill level in a way that teaches the concepts you are working on while also challenging you to the extent that makes you feel engaged, confident and ready to try again.

Learning to read is similar. My short advice: let kids explore all books, while also reading a few books on their reading level to stretch and grow their skills. Present the leveled books as a gift and a special time together rather than a punishment. My hope is that these lists help parents provide the right books for their kids so that all kids become confident readers!

Hondo & Fabian by Peter McCarty. 

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Pouch! by David Ezra Stein.

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Swimmy By Leo Lionni. 

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Draw Me A Star by Eric Carle. 

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A Kiss for Little Bear by Maurice Sendak. 

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Are you Ready to Play Outside?  Mo Willems

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Kitten's First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes. 

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Ten, Nine, Eight by Molly Bang.

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The Pidgeon Has Feelings, Too! Mo Willems

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Polar Bear, Polar Bear What Do You Hear? by Bill Martin Jr, Eric Carle. 

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The Carrott Seed by Ruth Krauss

 
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Freight Train by Donald Crews

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For other books on a Level G/H consider the favorites by Mo Williams. The appropriate titles on this particular level include I Really Like Slop, The Big Guy Took My Ball, There Is a Bird on Your Head and Are You Ready to Play Outside? 

 

Books to Read After BOB books

Fountas & Pinnell Level E/F, DRA 8-10

There's a lot of controversy about sharing a child's reading level. I like to think of it this way: you would never walk into an advanced tennis class before picking up a racket, right? You want to practice new skills on your skill level in a way that teaches the concepts you are working on while also challenging you to the extent that makes you feel engaged, confident and ready to try again. 

Learning to read is similar. My short advice: let kids explore all books, while also reading a few books on their reading level to stretch and grow their skills. Present the leveled books as a reward and a special time together rather than a punishment. My hope is that these lists help parents provide the right books for their kids so that all kids become confident readers!

Viva Frida by Yuyi Morales

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Not A Stick and Not A Box by Antoinette Portis

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You Are (Not) Small! Boxed Set by Anna Kang. If you want to dip your toe in, try You Are (Not) Small first.

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Today Is Monday by Eric Carle

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A Color of His Own By Leo Lionni. F

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Fly High, Fly Guy! by Tedd Arnold. (f)

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The Adventures of Taxi Dog by Debra Barracca and Sal Barracca, Illustrated by Mark Buehner. (E)

 
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The Cat and the Bird in the Hat by Norman Bridwell. (E)

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This Little Chick by John Lawrence. (e)

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My Favorite Bear by Andrea Gabriel. (e)

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Mama Cat Has Three Kittens by Denise Fleming. (f)

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For other books on a Level E/F consider the Pete the Cat series as well as Dr. Suess. The appropriate titles on this exact level include:

If your new reader becomes interested in Pete then pair these books with nighttime read-alouds, that you read to your child. Another classic and general crowd pleaser to read after BOB books is Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed. 

 

Picture Books for Children’s Worries and Anxieties

Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall. Each child copes with worries in their own way. Sometimes kids feel ready and even appear overly confident but find out that feeling scared is just part of trying something new. Jabari Jumps is a relatable and straightforward story. Jabari practiced and passed his swim test but stalls when it’s time to climb to the top of the diving board. When Jabari finds the courage, the author shows how proud he feels and even excited to try more difficult tasks.

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Me and My Fear by Francesca Sanna. From the author of The Journey, Sanna continues the beautiful story of immigration, as a young girl settles into a new country and school. This book shows a type of courage and anxiety that not every child will experience, but each can relate to in some way. If you haven’t read The Journey to your children, I encourage you to do so. It is a beautiful and moving book about a refugee family and the sacrifices they make for safety and security.

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What Do You Do With a Problem? by Kobi Yamada, Illustrated by Mae Besom. From the creators of What Do You Do With an Idea? and What Do You Do With a Chance? this book is helpful for all ages. I recently read it to a group of 6th graders who were creating academic goals for the school year. The author shows how opportunities lie in every part of our lives, even the difficult ones.

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How Big Are Your Worries Little Bear? by Jayneen Sanders, Illustrated by Stephanie Fizer Coleman. How Big Are Your Worries Little Bear? is one that can help the child who is always thinking of the next thing on the agenda. Little Bear is a thoughtful and helpful read for parents and children and comes with discussion questions for each age group.

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Ruby’s Worry by Tom Percival. Ruby is, in fact, a happy child, as most kids with regular worries are. Yet when she meets her first worry, she realizes it’s hard to make it go away all on her own. Something about this book reminds me of the way that Headspace presents worries and anxieties. I’ve been using the kid’s modules in the Headspace app in my classroom. Meditation is making a huge difference in my students’ ability to focus.

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The OK Book by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld. This book provides the vital message that you don’t need to be great at everything or anything to try out a new activity. We just need to have fun trying new things!

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The Book of Mistakes by Corinna Luyken. The illustrations and colors in The Book of Mistakes make it a beautiful gift for both a child or an adult. If I’m being honest, I like this book more than my kids do. The author shows how an artist can turn splotches and ink splatters into beautiful works of art. The author and illustrator also recently presented an exercise in Kazoo magazine for young girls in an article, Finding Beauty in Blunders.

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After The Fall (How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again) by Dan Santat. Ever wonder why Humpty Dumpty was sitting on the wall in the first place? He’s a bird watcher, of course! This adorable book shows what happens after Humpty’s fall and highlights the courage and resilience that is within all of our children.

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It’s Okay to Make Mistakes by Todd Parr. It seems Todd Parr is the Chicken Soup for the Soul messenger for children. He has a way of explaining the most relevant and complicated topics in the simplest manner that has all children nodding and agreeing. Also be sure to check out the I’M NOT SCARED Book.

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